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Abstract

FAST DISSOLVING FILMS (FDFs) AS A NEWER VENTURE IN FAST DISSOLVING DOSAGE FORMS

Fast-dissolving oral delivery systems are solid dosage forms, which disintegrate or dissolve within 1 min when placed in the mouth without drinking water or chewing. More recently, fast-dissolving films are gaining interest as an alternative to fast-dissolving tablets to definitely eliminate patient?s fear of chocking and overcome patent impediments. Fast-dissolving films are generally constituted of plasticized hydrocolloids or blends made of thereof that can be laminated by solvent casting or hot-melt extrusion. Thin film drug delivery, also referred to as orally dissolving thin film, and has emerged as an advanced alternative to the traditional tablets, capsules and liquids often associated with prescription and OTC medications. Similar in size, shape and thickness to a postage stamp, thin film strips are typically designed for oral administration, with the person placing the strip on or under the tongue or along the inside of the cheek. Thin film enables the drug to be delivered to the blood stream either intragastrically, buccally or sublingually. The sublingual and buccal delivery of a drug via thin film has the potential to improve the onset of action, lower the dosing, and enhance the efficacy and safety profile of the medicament. The 2-year-old, melt-in-your-mouth delivery system certainly has gained traction among consumers since the 2001 introduction of Pfizer’s Listerine Pocket Packs. And now many OTC suppliers are banking on that consumer acceptance as they try to leverage the thin strip technology against a new generation of self-care remedies. There are currently several projects in development that will deliver prescription drugs utilizing the thin film dosage form.


Author(s): Alpesh R. Patel, Dharmendra S. Prajapati, Jignyasha A. Raval

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